stirred up grief.

If there was ever a blessing behind the curse of grief, the sneaky kind that stalks and pounces on you at the last minute, it’s that you can know you’re one step closer to really learning something, and can understand the suffering of Christ on a more real and deeper level than ever before.

“Suffering is redemptive, beautiful, meaningful and very important to the Christian life. It shouldn’t be avoided, but instead consecrated to Christ.”
-Audrey Assad

This song she wrote is beautiful.

You could plant me like a tree beside a river
You could tangle me in soil and let my roots run wild
And I would blossom like a flower in the desert
But for now just let me cry

You could raise me like a banner in a battle
Put victory like a fire behind my shining eyes
And I would drift like falling snow over the embers
But for now just let me lie

Bind up these broken bones
Mercy bend and breathe me back to life
But not before You show me how to die

Set me like a star before the morning
Like a song that steals the darkness from a world asleep
And I’ll illuminate the path You’ve laid before me
But for now just let me be

Bind up these broken bones
Mercy bend and breathe me back to life
But not before You show me how to die
Oh, not before You show me how to die

So let me go like a leaf upon the water
Let me brave the wild currents flowing to the sea
And I will disappear into a deeper beauty
But for now just stay with me
God, for now just stay with me

-Audrey Assad – Show Me

How to suffer with others

To suffer with another person does not mean to drown one self in the other’s suffering; that would be as foolish as jumping into a pool to save a sinking swimmer only to drown oneself. More to the point, I doubt that it is even possible to enter fully into another person’s pain, for suffering is a profoundly solitary experience. To suffer with another person means to be there in whatever way possible, to share the circumstances of the other’s life as much as one can- not to add to the world’s pool of suffering, but to gain intimate understanding of what the other requires.
What we usually learn, once we are there, is that there is no “fix” for the person who suffers, only the slow painful process of walking through the suffering to whatever lies on the other side. Once there, we learn that being there is the best we can do, being there not as a cure but as a companion to the person who suffers on his or her slow journey. There is no arm’s length “solution” for suffering, and people who offer such only add to the pain. But there is comfort and even healing in the presence of people who know how to be with others, how to be fully there.
The Active Life by Parker Palmer